Fabric Button Tufted Headboard

DIY FABRIC BUTTON TUFTED HEADBOARD WITH BUTTONS FROM BUTTON BIZ

We received an email from a customer that has finished a custom upholstered headboard using our Size 45 Fabric Buttons – Loop Back. Her project was a tufted headboard completed with fabric buttons from Button Biz. She says:

My project turned out great. I did a tufted headboard. Here are some photos for you.

The only tip I have is that I used a heavier upholstery grade fabric. So, when I went to make the buttons I found that I needed to use a rubber mallet to ensure they were secure.  This was especially important because I knew the tufting process would put stress on the finished buttons.  I found that it was easiest to set up the button, put the plastic button making tool on top, hold it in place with a flat putty knife and then tap it with the rubber mallet until secure.  It must be a rubber mallet, because a regular hammer would bend the buttons.  There was a slight learning curve to this and I smashed one of the button making tools before I figured out what worked best. I am glad that I ordered two button making tools so I had a spare one on hand!.  I would definitely use these again for future projects.

 

tufted-headboard-1 tufted-headboard-2 tufted-headboard-3 tufted-headboard-4

Customer Review After One Week with a Button Maker

We received some great feedback from a customer that has only been using a button maker for a week. Our customer’s name is Jack Fisher and he is 80 years old. If you are 8 or 80, you can use a button maker.

Here’s some feedback from an 80 year old.


You asked – so here is my evaluation after less than a week:

1) I continue learning the online button designer, and have enjoyed its capabilities.  It still lacks the capability to save a design, and go back and make minor changes to the original.  But I am dealing with that.

2) It is a thrill to use the Tecre machine compared to the assembly rings, and bench press.  The work is speeded up dramatically.  I only regret that I still have over 400 button parts for my old button machine.  I will be glad to retire that process.

3) For the Tecre machine, I mounted it on a nice piece of Mahogany, and lined the bottom with shelf cushion.  This prevents any possible scratching of the work table.

Button Maker Review button-maker-review-2

4) The circle cutter is a pleasure to use compared to the plastic circle cutter I had been using for years.

I modified the hole in the guide plate to be about one millimeter larger than the original instructions directed.  I used sandpaper to do this.  The reason is to prevent the cutter wheel from possible interference from the guide plate, which I had noticed.  It works well this way:

Circle Cutter Review

Circle Cutter Review 2

I modified the second guide plate to accommodate the B.A.M. size buttons.  It is easy to adjust the circle cutter for that size – and I can banish the plastic cutter forever.

5) After using the steel cutting plate, I decided to try the craft type cutting board I had been previously been using.  It seems to work equally well as the steel plate.  These boards are available from craft stores.  I am still able to perfectly cut multiple sheets at once.  Perhaps the cutting wheel edge may last longer this way.

Circle Cutter

Ryan, at my age (80) and in good health, I anticipate a lifetime of enjoyable use with my new machine.  I have already made over 100 buttons for charity, and anticipate more, along with some profitable ventures.  The new equipment will soon pay for itself, and I expect I may be ordering more supplies before long.

Jack Fisher
Roswell, New Mexico

Jack Fisher